REPOST: Fine Art Can Be A Fine Investment

The investment world offers a wide range of assets in which investors can potentially grow their money. But beyond the stock and bond markets, their are other alternative assets that may provide higher returns over the long term. And they include fine art. Read the following article on Investopedia for more information:

The painting you bought to match your sofa may increase in worth, or it may be as salable as your kid’s pasta-filled craft project.

As with any investment, you need to do your research and go beyond your comfort zone. The art market is fickle, and there are no guarantees of profitability, but with a little legwork and forethought you can fill your home with images that may prove worthy investments down the line. Consider these tips for choosing fine art and identifying the Michelangelo from the macaroni.

Original Ideas: Paintings and Giclées
You walk into a gallery and fall in love with a $5,000 painting, but you just can’t justify the price tag. The gallery owner shows you a selection of the same artist’s work for a humble $500, explaining that the pieces are giclées. A giclée is a machine-made print, a reproduction printed on fine paper or canvas with color and clarity that can rival the original. But it’s still a copy.

The rarity of a work of art is what gives it value, so an original will always be worth more than a reproduction. While a giclée may come labeled with superlatives like “museum quality” or “archival”, and the seller may hawk a certificate of authenticity, it will never be as valuable as an original. Some artists and appraisers even view giclées as a gimmick for novice artists and neophyte collectors.

Still, there’s no denying that a giclée puts fine art within reach for many art enthusiasts, and while a certificate doesn’t lend much value to the reproduction, a fresh signature and especially a remarque (an original drawing made by the artist in the margin of the giclée) could bump up future value.

You may hear stories of giclées being proudly exhibited at such noble institutions as the BritishMuseum and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, but the pieces held in these collections are limited edition Iris prints of digital images or digital manipulations – such as “Nest and Trees” by Kiki Smith at the Met. They are not reproductions of original paintings. Museums do, however, sell giclée versions of masterpieces to generate income. These giclées, though pleasing to your eye and soul, won’t pull in any future income for you.

Doing the Loupe de Loupe: Prints and Posters
Maxfield Parrish and Courier & Ives brought art into the homes of America at the turn of the century with their mass-produced prints. These images are the predecessors of the posters sold in malls and museum shops today. Posters, like giclées, give you access to a masterpiece, but a poster is not the same as a fine art print, which can be in the form of a hand-pulled silkscreen, lithograph or block print.

You can often distinguish an artist print from a poster with the naked eye, though in some cases you may need a loupe or magnifying glass. The process of offset printing leaves a tiny dot matrix on the paper – think of a comic book or a Roy Lichtenstein painting with its exaggerated dots of color.

Several factors determine the value of an artist’s print: the size of the edition, that is, the number of prints the artist makes of one work; the significance of the work; the condition of the print; and whether it is signed and numbered by the artist. In the market for prints, it is rarity that bestows value. A low run of limited edition prints is more valuable than a mass-produced image. Even an earlier pull of a print – say No.10 of 100 (rather than No 80 of 100) – can mean better value.

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