Art of freedom: Self-published authors who made millions

Being an author entails hard work and intense dedication. Before becoming successful, they often need to deal with several challenges and break barriers. From submitting their work to their editor alone, for example, they need to write tens to hundreds of thousands of words and mold it into an interesting story. During the entire process, they are faced with pitfalls such as writer’s block and diminished productivity.

When they do finish their work, it still isn’t guaranteed that they’ll be making money off of it. Their fate is literally dependent on whether or not the public will view it favorably. However, despite the countless trials, some authors were able to make a name for themselves and millions of dollars in the process. More interestingly, a few of them were self-published and didn’t rely on the help of any major publishing house!

 

 

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One name in this category which will continually pop up is Amanda Hocking. She is one of the first authors who was able to make millions by self-publishing and independently selling e-books. Some of her most famous works include the ‘My Blood Approves’ series and the ‘Trylle’ trilogy.

 

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Another impressive self-published author goes by the name of Hugh Howey. Before writing dystopian sci-fi trilogies, he was creating short stories. After adding more content to his masterpieces, he then decided to publish them through Kindle’s Direct Publishing system. He became a huge hit and rose in popularity.

 

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Many might not know but E.L James herself was a self-published author, with her ‘50 Shades of Grey’ novels reaching the top of many best-seller lists. The trilogy actually started as a fan fic of Twilight which was published online. One thing led to another, and a whole new world of eroticism was born.

 

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Today’s age of e-books and self-publishing platforms (such as CreateSpace, Lulu, and Amazon Kindle Direct Publishing) has made it possible for almost anyone to become an author without the need for a traditional publisher or literary agent. It might require heavy promotional efforts but rewards (especially on the financial side) can be potentially lucrative (as authors tend to get higher cut on each work sold as compared to royalties they earn from a conventional publishing setup).