The Lost Peace: Leadership in a Time of Horror and Hope, 1945-1953

The Lost Peace Leadership in a Time of Horror and Hope Robert Dallek brings to this majestic work a profound understanding of history a deep engagement in foreign policy and a lifetime of studying leadership The story of what went wrong during the postw

  • Title: The Lost Peace: Leadership in a Time of Horror and Hope, 1945-1953
  • Author: Robert Dallek
  • ISBN: 9780061628665
  • Page: 277
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Robert Dallek brings to this majestic work a profound understanding of history, a deep engagement in foreign policy, and a lifetime of studying leadership The story of what went wrong during the postwar period has never been intelligently explored Doris Kearns Goodwin, author of the Pulitzer Prize winning Team of RivalsRobert Dalleck follows his bestselling Nixon Robert Dallek brings to this majestic work a profound understanding of history, a deep engagement in foreign policy, and a lifetime of studying leadership The story of what went wrong during the postwar period has never been intelligently explored Doris Kearns Goodwin, author of the Pulitzer Prize winning Team of RivalsRobert Dalleck follows his bestselling Nixon and Kissenger Partners in Power and An Unfinished Life John F Kennedy, 1917 1963 with this masterful account of the crucial period that shaped the postwar world As the Obama Administration struggles to define its strategy for the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, Dallek s critical and compelling look at Truman, Churchill, Stalin, and other world leaders in the wake of World War II not only offers important historical perspective but provides timely insight on America s course into the future.

    The Lost Peace Leadership in a Time of Horror and Hope The Lost Peace Leadership in a Time of Horror and Hope, Robert Dallek on FREE shipping on qualifying offers Robert Dallek brings to this majestic work a profound understanding of history, a deep engagement in foreign policy The Lost Peace Leadership in a Time of Horror and Hope The Lost Peace Leadership in a Time of Horror and Hope, Kindle edition by Robert Dallek Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading The Lost Peace Leadership in People s Century Lost Peace Full Program Description Lost Peace opens with the last moments of the First World War Macinlay Wooden was an American serving on the western front The morning of November th, , Harry met me about a hundred yards from the battery position He says, Look here, Macinlay He had a The Lost Peace Leadership in a Time of Horror and Hope Oct , Yet, once that task was finished, the victorious Allies succumbed to suspicion, arrogance, and the murky world of power politics Set in the aftermath of WWII and covering the time until the breakout of the Korean War, The Lost Peace explores how Britain, France, Russia, and the United States slowly polarized into the West versus the East. The Lost Peace Leadership in a Time of Horror and Hope Dallek, who has written authoritative studies of the foreign policies of Franklin Roosevelt, Harry Truman, and Richard Nixon, offers here profiles of Allied and Axis leaders Winston Churchill, Adolf Hitler, Roosevelt, Joseph Stalin, and Truman, as well as fellow traveling generals and diplomats as they made fateful decisions about war and peace. The Lost Peace CSMonitor The Lost Peace, instead, cites one single primary document The rest comes from secondary sources and even, a few times, Even worse, he overlooks some of the best scholarship on the cold war, work from respected scholars like Odd Arne Westad, Bruce Kuniholm, Walter LaFeber, and others. The Road to World War II Part Versailles The Lost Mar , Own the collectible DVD pk This classic series follows the events that sparked the greatest conflict of the century BRADLEY R GITZ The lost peace arkansasonline The cause of peace would have almost certainly been better served by the victors embracing either Wilson s position of generosity toward the Germans much as Metternich and Castlereagh had Won the War, Lost the Peace TV Tropes Won the War, Lost the Peace A close relative of Pyrrhic Victory the difference is in that Pyrrhic Victory is a victory achieved through an exertion a bit too big to bear, while what we think of here is a victory that is squandered If you wish to add examples from Real Life, try to keep it as straight as you can, People s Century Part Lost Peace YouTube Nov , I do not own rights to this video and do not intend to infringe upon them for personal gain I am posting this series for educational purposes only.

    • [PDF] ✓ Unlimited ↠ The Lost Peace: Leadership in a Time of Horror and Hope, 1945-1953 : by Robert Dallek ß
      277 Robert Dallek
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] ✓ Unlimited ↠ The Lost Peace: Leadership in a Time of Horror and Hope, 1945-1953 : by Robert Dallek ß
      Posted by:Robert Dallek
      Published :2018-012-05T00:03:03+00:00

    About “Robert Dallek”

    1. Robert Dallek

      Robert Dallek is the author of Nixon and Kissinger , a Pulitzer Prize finalist, and An Unfinished Life John F Kennedy, 1917 1963 , among other books His writing has appeared in the The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Atlantic, and Vanity Fair He is an elected fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the Society of American Historians, for which he served as president in 2004 2005 He lives in Washington, D.C.

    799 thoughts on “The Lost Peace: Leadership in a Time of Horror and Hope, 1945-1953”

    1. Dallak's book chronicles the beginnings of the Cold War from the closing days of the Second World War to Korea. Though he shows that Uncle Joe and his minions in Moscow were very paranoid of Roosevelt and Churchill and saw them probably the same way he saw Hitler when he signed the Non-Agression pact in 1939, he hints that the Cold War was the fault of the West for not seeing until after the collapse of 1989 what an economic basket case the Soviet Union actually was.The premise is that George Ke [...]


    2. Nothing was so daunting a task to the world as the destruction of the Axis Powers. Yet, once that task was finished, the victorious Allies succumbed to suspicion, arrogance, and the murky world of power politics. Set in the aftermath of WWII and covering the time until the breakout of the Korean War, The Lost Peace explores how Britain, France, Russia, and the United States slowly polarized into the West versus the East. Democracy versus Communism. Good against evil. Much was driven by the perso [...]


    3. Not a fan! I bought this book online because it's dust jacket description sounded promising. I was introduced quite early in the book to its main theme and realized only then that this might not have been a good choice for me. Quite a negative overtone about what might have been if only this or that leader had chosen more wisely in this or that circumstance. The author's writing style failed to capture my attention at any point in the narrative and I only kept reading until page 107 out of respe [...]


    4. Dallek attempts to trace today's problems back to mistakes made during the early post-war years. For example, he argues that if the Republican Congress had properly debated Harry Truman, then Vietnam and the second Iraq War would have been prevented, and the Korean War, too. There's too much armchair governing in this history book for me to enjoy it. Hindsight is always 20/20, if we study history. But only if we study it and learn from it can we reduce likelihood of repeating the mistakes of the [...]


    5. A great history of the immediate post-World War II era. The book nominally focuses on the big personalities of the time to tell the story - Churchill, Truman, Eisenhower, Stalin, Mao, Churchill, Syngman Rhee. By the time you're done, you are thankful we muddled through when it would have been so easy to destroy ourselves. It provides a glimpse of real politik operating in the late 40s and early 50s, where idealism was banished from the scene.


    6. Key post war events and profiles of leaders and good and many bad decisions that shaped the postwar world - fascinating history of a really critical period in the modern world. Stalin, Churchill, Truman, Korea, Vietnam, the key roles of fear of nuclear war and fear of communism, I was surprised how little i knew about these people and events. But this happens almost every time i read a history book.


    7. Leftist apologia for Stalin and Mao. There was no peace to lose. Just ask the Finns, Estonians, Latvians, Lithuanians and Poles about Stalin's desire for peace. He was a bloody tyrant, a butcher on the same scale as Hitler. There was no practical difference between Hitler's Nazis and Stalin's Communists.


    8. Pretty meh. This would be a great book to assign to a class of students who are just beginning to learn about the post-war period, but as someone with the knowledge already, there was nothing new here.



    9. The second World War was destruction on a scale not previously seen in history. Was it possible that, given such a frenzy of brutality and atrocity, mankind might have turned from its warlike ways and sought a true end to all wars? Alas, it's a moot point as we know the history that followed. Although no global conflicts on a similar scale have occurred since, the respite has hardly been peaceful. The back of this book calls it "a striking reinterpretation of the postwar years." I wondered, did [...]


    10. How did the Cold War start? Could it have been avoided? The paths taken from the end of WWII to the death of Stalin and the conclusion of the Korean War seem to us looking back now to have been inevitable. Dalleck analyzes the choices made by leaders and nations and concludes that the options chosen by the super powers were by no means the only ones available to them. He suggests that a number of factors - largely domestic in nature - led to the hardening of attitudes between the east and west a [...]


    11. This is an interesting revisionist account of the end of the World War II and the beginning of the Cold War. Actually, it might be less of a revisionist account and more of a "what might have been" reading of history. Dallak writes a thorough account of the political maneuverings beginning the last year of the European Theater and and how they affected the peace process. He points out several opportunities that each side missed and suggests that if only one side or the other would have held a di [...]


    12. What feels like a classic big man view interpretation of the emerging Cold War period is actually a bit deeper, in that it shows how much domestic politics and economic concerns of the time shaped the decisions Britain and the U.S. This challenges the notion of a purely ideological struggle, though it surely was perceived as such by many at the time. The majority of this book focuses on the foreign policies of the Truman administration, and it does very well in that aspect. It bounces a bit, amo [...]


    13. This is an excellent summary that bridges the gap from WWII to the height of the Cold War. Dallek does a great job just explaining what happened without the overuse of detail or opinions. The Allies who needed Stalin to eliminate the greater evil Hitler, suddenly turn the cold shoulder to him once the war is over. Stalin is left in the cold doghouse while the US and England decide what to do with all their new weapons technology. Moreover, the map from Germany eastward all the way to Asia is red [...]


    14. This book is more overview than indepth analysis but it raised and attempted to answer some interesting post WWII questions regarding nationhood and foreign policy and the inevitable conflicts between morally right and politically necessary compromises/failures. Definitely worth a look. Ultimately seems hopeful for humankindunlike the next book I read.


    15. Looks at the post-WWII era in a different light ---- perhaps Truman and the others got it completely wrong, establishing a national-security state that caused a long, deadly, costly cold war that is bleeding us dry still today?


    16. Not a bad read, but the history of the early years of the Cold War has been done before and Dallek adds very little, other than a fair argument that organizing NATO was a mistake. Best as a volume for the reader looking for an intro on the topic.


    17. Interesting argument Dallek advances that world leaders just after World War II missed opportunities to build a lasting peace and avoid a Cold War through misunderstandings and hubris. Good read.


    18. It was pretty clear to me which side of center Mr. Dallek stands on, but he still managed to present the issues of the day in a fairly clear light.


    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *